I'm

still

posting

constellation

images,

even

though

they

were

already

in

the

previous update. Published 6/6/2022

Photography continued in February. The next shooting was on evening February 25, 2022. I chose the shooting direction to the west and so that the North Star was above the angle of view. At the bottom, I left the snowy roof of our house. Twenty-minute exposures came in four, so the total time is an hour and twenty minutes. The ISO value was 100 and the aperture was f2.8. The focal length was 16 mm as in all but one case. Now the star trails are really good and long in the picture. Otherwise, the mood is different from the previous pictures. The next time when I installed the camera in the yard was on February 27, 2022. Now I selected a shutter speed of 10 minutes for a single image. The ISO value was 160 and the aperture was f3.2. Now the camera's battery lasted for 22 shots, so the total exposure time is 220 minutes, or three hours and 40 minutes. Now the lines drawn by the stars are already reasonably long. The rotation of Earth is 55 degrees. The picture could already be considered almost perfect. Despite the previous “almost perfect” picture, I continued to photograph. The next image was created in the same way as the previous one; camera to the yard tripod and remote control settings to control the camera. The goal was a 30 ten minute pictures. Again, the camera ran out of battery and the result was only 19 pictures. The images were well overexposed because I had set the ISO to 320, which was too big value on conditions. However, with Light Room, I was able to publish the images. The end result is below. Perhaps the most interesting picture was taken during the last evning of March and the first night of April. The camera was again set on the tripod on the yard to take pictures with ten minutes of exposure. The camera's battery lasted 19 shots, so the total exposure time is three hours and ten minutes. The aperture was f3.5 and the ISO was 320. The result was an almost perfect picture of star orbit. A bright spot of light, like a star, in the southwest corner of the image make it interesting. To solve the riddle of the point of light needed Ursa. The phenomenon was first interpreted as a satellite that turned in sunlight during imaging. Another theory was that misaligned street lights street light reflect to the camera lens. The final theory is tile-like ice crystals in the air that form a pillar of light. The actual light source is almoust two kilometers from our yard. It´a strong construction site light, which is actual opposite the point of light and behind the camera. I also made a small video of the phenomenon that everyone can use to judge what it is all about. The ligthspot appears in the images at the end of the video. The same phenomenon was repeated in the following image, which I toke on April 3, 2022. Now the point of light is visible near the North Star, although not as bright as in the previous image. By the way, this picture is as perfect as the previous one. Twenty pictures which each has 10 minutes of exposure makes together three hours and twenty minutes. ISO -value is 200 and the aperture is f3.2 .These pictures are not over yet. I wanted to test how the light of the moon affects the shooting. April 16, 2022 was the time of the full moon. Now I chose under a pine branch in our yard as a shooting location. I set the ISO value to 100 and the aperture to 6.3. The camera battery now lasts a few minutes more than three hours. Images, which exposure were15-minute became 12 and one pictures exposure was six minute. Despite the moonlight, the star orbit patterns are well reproduced in the picture. Next to it is another photo taken from the same place on April 18, 2022. Now, however, I moved the camera so far that the North Star remained visible. The settings were ISO 100 and the aperture was f6.3, which turned out to be too small because the images were really dark. Pictures had to be adjusted quite by law. During this shooting, the camera did not take three timed images. The same phenomenon also occurs in later constellation images. This brings an interesting effect to the picture. The very next evening, April 19, 2022, I photographed the stars in our backyard. Again, the camera did not take some pictures, so the lines are not uniform. Now I set the aperture to f5.6. The ISO value was 100. In these shots, the hardest part is finding the right camera settings and the right angle of view. In addition, the camera battery sets its own limits. Especially in the cold. In my camera, the maximum battery life is a little over three hours. This problem could be solved with the battery handle. The last star orbital image taken from the yard circle is again the image taken under the branches of the apple trees. The trick of the camera continued. Now it exposed a few images with a shutter speed of only 7 or 8 seconds instead of the pre-set fifteen minutes. The lines drawn by the stars were again broken. Still the problem is finding the right camera settings. The last is a picture taken from Lestijärvi Paranta towards the village. The goal was to get at least two hours of combined exposure. Behind the village, however, a cloud curtain rose, limiting the images to two ten-minute exposures. This is a picture I have been planning to I renew sometimes.
2

I'm

still

posting

constellation

images,

even

though

they

were

already

in

the

previous update. Published 6/6/2022

P h o t o g r a p h y continued in February. The next shooting was on evening February 25, 2022. I chose the shooting direction to the west and so that the North Star was above the angle of view. At the bottom, I left the snowy roof of our house. Twenty- minute exposures came in four, so the total time is an hour and twenty minutes. The ISO value was 100 and the aperture was f2.8. The focal length was 16 mm as in all but one case. Now the star trails are really good and long in the picture. Otherwise, the mood is different from the previous pictures. The next time when I installed the camera in the yard was on February 27, 2022. Now I selected a shutter speed of 10 minutes for a single image. The ISO value was 160 and the aperture was f3.2. Now the camera's battery lasted for 22 shots, so the total exposure time is 220 minutes, or three hours and 40 minutes. Now the lines drawn by the stars are already reasonably long. The rotation of Earth is 55 degrees. The picture could already be considered almost perfect. Despite the previous “almost perfect” picture, I continued to photograph. The next image was created in the same way as the previous one; camera to the yard tripod and remote control settings to control the camera. The goal was a 30 ten minute pictures. Again, the camera ran out of battery and the result was only 19 pictures. The images were well overexposed because I had set the ISO to 320, which was too big value on conditions. However, with Light Room, I was able to publish the images. The end result is below. Perhaps the most interesting picture was taken during the last evning of March and the first night of April. The camera was again set on the tripod on the yard to take pictures with ten minutes of exposure. The camera's battery lasted 19 shots, so the total exposure time is three hours and ten minutes. The aperture was f3.5 and the ISO was 320. The result was an almost perfect picture of star orbit. A bright spot of light, like a star, in the southwest corner of the image make it interesting. To solve the riddle of the point of light needed Ursa. The phenomenon was first interpreted as a satellite that turned in sunlight during imaging. Another theory was that misaligned street lights street light reflect to the camera lens. The final theory is tile-like ice crystals in the air that form a pillar of light. The actual light source is almoust two kilometers from our yard. It´a strong construction site light, which is actual opposite the point of light and behind the camera. I also made a small video of the phenomenon that everyone can use to judge what it is all about. The ligthspot appears in the images at the end of the video. The same phenomenon was repeated in the following image, which I toke on April 3, 2022. Now the point of light is visible near the North Star, although not as bright as in the previous image. By the way, this picture is as perfect as the previous one. Twenty pictures which each has 10 minutes of exposure makes together three hours and twenty minutes. ISO -value is 200 and the aperture is f3.2 .These pictures are not over yet. I wanted to test how the light of the moon affects the shooting. April 16, 2022 was the time of the full moon. Now I chose under a pine branch in our yard as a shooting location. I set the ISO value to 100 and the aperture to 6.3. The camera battery now lasts a few minutes more than three hours. Images, which exposure were15-minute became 12 and one pictures exposure was six minute. Despite the moonlight, the star orbit patterns are well reproduced in the picture. Next to it is another photo taken from the same place on April 18, 2022. Now, however, I moved the camera so far that the North Star remained visible. The settings were ISO 100 and the aperture was f6.3, which turned out to be too small because the images were really dark. Pictures had to be adjusted quite by law. During this shooting, the camera did not take three timed images. The same phenomenon also occurs in later constellation images. This brings an interesting effect to the picture. The very next evening, April 19, 2022, I photographed the stars in our backyard. Again, the camera did not take some pictures, so the lines are not uniform. Now I set the aperture to f5.6. The ISO value was 100. In these shots, the hardest part is finding the right camera settings and the right angle of view. In addition, the camera battery sets its own limits. Especially in the cold. In my camera, the maximum battery life is a little over three hours. This problem could be solved with the battery handle. The last star orbital image taken from the yard circle is again the image taken under the branches of the apple trees. The trick of the camera continued. Now it exposed a few images with a shutter speed of only 7 or 8 seconds instead of the pre-set fifteen minutes. The lines drawn by the stars were again broken. Still the problem is finding the right camera settings. The last is a picture taken from Lestijärvi Paranta towards the village. The goal was to get at least two hours of combined exposure. Behind the village, however, a cloud curtain rose, limiting the images to two ten-minute exposures. This is a picture I have been planning to I renew sometimes.